Home > ABB Australia’s IRB 140 robots utilised for building Large Hadron Collider’s accelerator rings

ABB Australia’s IRB 140 robots utilised for building Large Hadron Collider’s accelerator rings

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article image The Large Hadron Collider’s accelerator rings

ABB Australia , power and automation technology providers, have supplied two IRB 140 robots as a part of a laser welding system, designed to manufacture thousands of stainless steel alloy tubing assemblies for the two accelerator rings of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

ABB Australia’s robots performed 54 million precision welding operations to build the two accelerator rings in the LHC, through which particles were beamed recently to recreate the beginning of the universe.

The LHC conducted its inaugural experiment by smashing subatomic particles together at 99.99% the speed of light to recreate conditions in the universe one billionth of a second after the Big Bang.

The particles were beamed in opposite directions through the two 27-kilometer accelerator rings and were smashed together at 600 million times per second. The results were measured in four huge detectors.

Located in a tunnel 50-150 meters beneath the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) on the Swiss-French border, the LHC has taken 20 years to be installed. Each tubing assembly is 15-18 metres in length and comprises a complex arrangement of components welded to demanding specifications.

According to Chris Moore, a director of Garrandale Systems, designers of the tubing assembly along with Ferranti Photonics, the IRB robots from ABB Australia were a combination of precision tooling and high level programming, resulting in accuracy and repeatability.

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