Home > Perovskite-based photodetector to be cheaper and more sensitive

Perovskite-based photodetector to be cheaper and more sensitive

Editorial
article image Researchers from the UCLA have now developed a photodetector that uses thin coatings of perovskite, rather than silicon or other common materials.

A NEW perovskite photodetector could reduce manufacturing costs and improve the quality of medical and commercial light sensors.

Photodetectors convert incoming light into electrical signals. They are used in a variety of products, from visible and infrared light detection systems to television remote controls.

Perovskite is an organic-inorganic hybrid material with a crystal structure that can very efficiently convert light into electricity. In recent years, perovskite materials have been applied to massively boost the efficiency of solar cells.

Researchers from the UCLA have now developed a photodetector that uses thin coatings of perovskite, rather than silicon or other common materials.

The 300nm perovskite coating is about 330 times thinner than the silicon layer used in common photodetectors.

This allows the photodetector to efficiently and quickly transport signals with minimal loss. It also offers improved sensitivity under dim light.

According to the researchers, the device could improve the efficiency and contrast in optical sensors used in various applications. Production is also more energy-efficient and faster than current photodetector manufacturing processes.

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