Home > Sun-powered light sculpture to show new applications for solar technology

Sun-powered light sculpture to show new applications for solar technology

Editorial
article image “Ray” will be made up of strips of multi-coloured light connecting to a base.

SYDNEY’s Vivid light festival 2014 will for the first time since its inception be host to a solar powered installation.

The seven metre tall “Ray” light sculpture, to be positioned outside the Museum of Contemporary Art, is the brainchild of startup social enterprise Pollinate Energy, an Australian company which installs solar lights in India’s urban slums.

“Ray” will be made up of strips of multi-coloured light connecting to a base. Festival goers can interact with “Ray” by pulling on the vines located in the charging pods, which will result in light shooting towards the summit of the sculpture. Ray will gradually get fully charged from the coloured lights pouring in, and at that point will overflow in a surge of sound, light and colour.

A varied team worked on the light sculpture, including lighting design duo amigo & amigo and digital interactivity designers S1T2. The online interactivity component of “Ray” was shaped by experience design team Wildwon.

Importantly, the sculpture derives its power from Southern Cross University’s “Sunflower” solar rig.

The “Sunflower”, created by Dr Barry Hill, is a project developed to provide solar power to music festivals in locations where there is no power available.

By combining the solar generator with low power LED lighting and new energy efficient audio technologies, Dr Hill aimed to run music festival stages entirely from solar power.

According to Dr Hill, the “Sunflower” is more than just a solar power generator – when used as part of the “Ray” sculpture, it will make use of a new data communication system which allows the power generation and discharge cycle data from the solar generator to be used to create audio visual works.

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